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SLU Researchers Discover Structure of Protein Associated with Inflammation, Parkinson’s

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, Saint Louis University scientists report that they have determined the structure of a key protein that is involved in the body’s inflammatory response. This finding opens the door to developing new treatments for a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease, diabetes and cancer to neurodegenerative disorders, including

New way to fight sepsis: Rev up patients’ immune systems

While many people have never heard of sepsis, it causes about 250,000 deaths annually in the United States. The condition develops when an infection triggers an overwhelming immune response, ultimately wreaking havoc on the immune system. Standard treatment involves high doses of antibiotics that fight the infection, but they often don’t work well and fail

New Study Examines Investigational Drug Given Early to Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s

In a new multi-center Phase II/III clinical trial, Saint Louis University researchers will test the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug’s ability to slow the decline of brain function and possibly delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do not yet have symptoms of the illness. George Grossberg,

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapy

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat cancer. These therapies involve collecting a patient’s own immune cells — called T cells — and supercharging them to home in on and attack specific blood cancers, such as hard-to-treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But so far, these T

Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas

Recent research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrated that mature cells in the stomach sometimes revert back to behaving like rapidly dividing stem cells. Now, the researchers have found that this process may be universal; no matter the organ, when tissue responds to certain types of injury, mature cells seem to

February 22nd, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer|Tags: , , , |

Cutting off cervical cancer’s fuel supply stymies tumors

Cancer therapies have improved — in some cases dramatically — over the past two decades, but treatment for cervical cancer has remained largely unchanged. All patients receive radiation and chemotherapy, yet despite the aggressive approach, the regimen fails in about one-third of patients with cervical cancer that has spread beyond the cervix but not outside

February 15th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

Altering Huntington’s disease patients’ skin cells into brain cells sheds light on disorder

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have transformed skin cells from patients with Huntington’s disease into the type of brain cell affected by the disorder. The resulting mass of neurons serves as a new tool to study the degenerative and eventually fatal neurological condition, according to the researchers. The study, published

SLU Research: Opioid Cessation May Be More Successful When Depression Is Treated

Jeffrey Scherrer, Ph.D., professor of family and community medicine at Saint Louis University and his co-authors have found depression is a consequence of chronic opioid use. In the current study, they find that patients with chronic prescription opioid use and depression who adhered to anti-depressant medications were more likely to stop opioids. Exploratory analysis found

Stroke recovery improved by sensory deprivation, mouse study show

Temporarily shutting off neuronal signals to a healthy part of the brain may aid stroke recovery, according to new research in mice. The findings, from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, are published Jan. 31 in Science Translational Medicine. Mice that had experienced strokes were more likely to recover the ability

February 5th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Stroke|Tags: , , |

ID’ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic flu

The current influenza outbreak – the worst across the United States in nearly a decade – is worrisome but still far less dire than a pandemic flu, which could kill millions. Such pandemics are exceedingly difficult to predict, but new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis offers details about flu viruses

February 2nd, 2018|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |