Around The State

Home/Around The State

SLU Surgeons Study ‘Awake Aneurysm Surgery’ for Better Outcomes

In a first time study published in the August edition of the Journal of Neurosurgery, Saint Louis University surgeons and researchers report that the use of conscious sedation – also called “awake brain surgery” – allowed them to make adjustments mid-surgery to lower risks during aneurysm surgery. The research was led by Saleem Abdulrauf, M.D.,

August 21st, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |

Increased Endometrial Cancer Rates Found in Women with High Levels of Cadmium

By Derek Thompson Researcher recommends women limit cadmium intake More than 31,000 new cases of endometrial cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2017. Through a five-year observational study recently published in PLOS One, researchers at the University of Missouri found that women with increased levels of cadmium — a metal commonly found in foods

Protein-rich diet may help soothe inflamed gut

Immune cells patrol the gut to ensure that harmful microbes hidden in the food we eat don’t sneak into the body. Cells that are capable of triggering inflammation are balanced by cells that promote tolerance, protecting the body without damaging sensitive tissues. When the balance tilts too far toward inflammation, inflammatory bowel disease can result.

CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndrome

Using the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggests new lines of investigation into how to treat this condition — dyskeratosis congenita —

August 2nd, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , , |

Anxious? Cellular roots of anxiety identified

From students stressing over exams to workers facing possible layoffs, worrying about the future is a normal and universal experience. But when people’s anticipation of bad things to come starts interfering with daily life, ordinary worry can turn into an anxiety disorder. About one in four adults will struggle with anxiety at some point in

Aggressive UTI bacteria hijack copper, feed off it

by Julia Evangelou Strait Copper has long been known for its ability to kill bacteria and other microbes. But in an interesting twist, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria — those at the root of hard-to-treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) — hijack trace

July 28th, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |

Blood test IDs key Alzheimer’s marker

Decades before people with Alzheimer’s disease develop memory loss and confusion, their brains become dotted with plaques made of a sticky protein – called amyloid beta – that is thought to contribute to the disease and its progression. Currently, the only way to detect amyloid beta in the brain is via PET scanning, which is

In autism, genes drive early eye gaze abnormalities

Twin study reveals strong genetic influences on how infants visually explore social world New research has uncovered compelling evidence that genetics plays a major role in how children look at the world and whether they have a preference for gazing at people’s eyes and faces or at objects. The discovery by researchers at Washington University

Type 1 diabetes risk linked to intestinal viruses

Doctors can’t predict who will develop Type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which one’s own immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring. Now, a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that viruses in the intestines

Malaria drug protects fetuses from Zika infection

Devastating consequences of Zika virus infection are suffered in the womb, where the virus can cause brain damage and sometimes death. Studying pregnant mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned that the Zika virus infects the fetus by manipulating the body’s normal barrier to infection. Moreover, they showed that