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MU School of Medicine researcher uncovers clue to as to how disease processes develop

A new study could have major implications for our understanding of disease processes for conditions such as autoimmunity, atherosclerosis and heart failure, potentially leading to better prevention and treatment. Dr. Edward T.H. Yeh, chairman of the Department of Medicine and director of the Center for Precision Medicine at the University of Missouri School of Medicine, has been leading a team of

$5 million supports innovative breast cancer trial

A $5 million grant from the Department of Defense will support research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis aimed at improving breast cancer therapies. The research focuses on HER2-positive breast cancer. Such tumors are dotted with an overabundance of so-called HER2 receptors. About 20 percent of women with breast cancer have HER2-positive

Food for Thought: Ketogenic Diets Reduce Athletes’ Anaerobic Performance

In a small study, Edward Weiss, Ph.D., associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Saint Louis University, together with SLU graduate students Kym Wroble, R.D. and Morgan Trott, R.D.,  examined the exercise performance of 16 men and women after following either a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet or a high-carbohydrate diet for four days. His team then tested

May 3rd, 2018|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |

Rates of autism continue to rise, new data indicate

New statistics indicate rates of autism in children have continued to increase. However, the rates have increased only modestly, suggesting  there may be a leveling off. Still, researchers found that many children aren’t getting diagnosed until age 4 or older. The older a child is at diagnosis, the harder it is for health-care professionals to

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment

Researchers from Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which was published on April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect and allow myeloma

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complication

An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what’s known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells

ALS, rare dementia share genetic link

Nearly half of all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neuromuscular disorder, develop cognitive problems that affect memory and thinking. Why a disease that primarily affects movement also disrupts thinking has been unclear. But now, an international team of researchers has identified genetic links between ALS and frontotemporal dementia, a rare disorder marked

April 10th, 2018|Categories: ALS, Around The State, Disease Specific|Tags: , |

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cells

As people age, their immune systems age, too. And new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that aging immune cells increase the risk for age-related macular degeneration, a major cause of blindness in the United States. Studying mice and cells from patients, the researchers found that as immune cells called