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$3.7 million to help research neurological disorders linked to manganese

Manganese – found in smoke from steel production and coal fires – has been linked to a range of neurological problems often seen with Parkinson’s disease: slowness, stiffness, tremors, anxiety, depression, cognitive changes, and difficulty walking and speaking. Decades ago, federal environmental and public health agencies established manganese-concentration levels of concern for human health, but

SLU Scientist: Hibernating Ribosomes Help Bacteria Survive

In the second of two high-profile articles published in recent weeks, Saint Louis University scientist Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., in collaboration with the laboratories of 2009 Nobel laureate in chemistry Ada Yonath at the Weizmann Institute of Science and Alexey Amunts at Stockholm University, describe in Nature Communications new information about the structure of Staphylococcus

October 12th, 2017|Categories: Around The State, General News|Tags: , , |

Chemo-loaded nanoparticles target breast cancer that has spread to bone

Breast cancer that spreads often infiltrates bone, causing fractures and intense pain. In such cases, chemotherapy is ineffective because the environment of the bone protects the tumor, even as the drug has toxic side effects elsewhere in the body. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a nanoparticle that

Bone Marrow Concentrate Improves Joint Transplants

Biologic joint restoration using donor tissue instead of traditional metal and plastic may be an option for active patients with joint defects. Although recovery from a biologic joint repair is typically longer than traditional replacement, successful biologic restoration allows patients to return to full activity. However, in some cases, the transplanted bone does not heal

New Technology Helps Take Guesswork Out of Prostate Cancer Detection

For 61-year-old marketing director Gene Frazier, ignorance is anything but bliss. Frazier’s father died of complications from prostate cancer at 71, putting his son at an increased risk of developing the disease. Thanks to a new technology used by urologists at University of Missouri Health Care, he knows he’s not leaving his prostate health to

Antibiotics warranted for kids with minor staph infections

The overuse of antibiotics has left some doctors questioning whether to give such drugs to children diagnosed with uncomplicated staph infections. Such infections often occur on the skin and look like a pus-filled bug bite. Now, research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that prescribing antibiotics — in addition to

Medical history can point to earlier Parkinson’s disease diagnosis

Before symptoms become pronounced, there is no reliable way to identify who is on track to develop Parkinson’s disease, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by tremors, slowness of movement, stiffness, and difficulty with balance and coordination. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have analyzed Medicare claims data of more than

Human skin cells transformed directly into motor neurons

Scientists working to develop new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases have been stymied by the inability to grow human motor neurons in the lab. Motor neurons drive muscle contractions, and their damage underlies devastating diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy, both of which ultimately lead to paralysis and early death. In new

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells

While Zika virus causes devastating damage to the brains of developing fetuses, it one day may be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine shows that the virus kills brain