Autism

Rates of autism continue to rise, new data indicate

New statistics indicate rates of autism in children have continued to increase. However, the rates have increased only modestly, suggesting  there may be a leveling off. Still, researchers found that many children aren’t getting diagnosed until age 4 or older. The older a child is at diagnosis, the harder it is for health-care professionals to

Predicting Autism & Other Developmental Delays: How Tech Can Empower Doctors

The current system by which we typically diagnose developmental and behavioral disorders in children is dysfunctional, as specialists are vastly outnumbered by at risk-children in need of appointments. For delays like autism, the earlier the diagnosis, the earlier the intervention can start and the more effective it becomes. We are in the early stages of

December 20th, 2017|Categories: Autism, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition

A defective gene linked to autism influences how neurons connect and communicate with each other in the brain, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Rodents that lack the gene form too many connections between brain neurons and have difficulty learning. The findings, published Nov. 2 in Nature Communications,

November 9th, 2017|Categories: Around The State, Autism, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

Late-breaking Mutations May Play an Important Role in Autism

by Boston's Children's Hospital A study of nearly 6,000 families, combining three genetic sequencing technologies, finds that mutations that occur after conception play an important role in autism. A team led by investigators at Boston Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard reports the findings today in Nature Neuroscience. Over the past decade,

July 24th, 2017|Categories: Autism, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

In autism, genes drive early eye gaze abnormalities

Twin study reveals strong genetic influences on how infants visually explore social world New research has uncovered compelling evidence that genetics plays a major role in how children look at the world and whether they have a preference for gazing at people’s eyes and faces or at objects. The discovery by researchers at Washington University

Brain Patterns at 6 Months Predict Autism in High-Risk Infants

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of brain connectivity in 6-month-old infants at high risk for autism successfully identified 9 of 11 babies who went on to be diagnosed with the disorder at 24 months of age, according to findings published online today in Science Translational Medicine. Moreover, the imaging data correctly categorized all 48 of

June 15th, 2017|Categories: Autism|Tags: , , , , , |

Researchers connect molecular function to high blood pressure, diseases

By Beth Miller March 1, 2017 Jianmin Cui’s lab investigated mechanisms of the an important ion channel called the BK channel, which is associated with high blood pressure, autism and movement disorders. By changing one small portion of a stimulus that influences part of one molecule’s function, engineers and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis

Unraveling autism

A multifaceted approach aims to detect, treat and even reverse the disorder. BY REBECCA BOYLE, January 3, 2017 Washington University in St. Louis - Like many patients visiting a doctor’s office, Kim Sebenoler started out her appointment by heading to the nearest restroom to give a urine sample. But her visit to the lab of

Discovery of a ‘Neuronal Big Bang’

Mon, 03/07/2016 - 11:07am University of Geneva This is an expression of all the genes of a neuron during the first hours after its birth. Each circle represents a development stage (6h, 12h, 24h), and the colored points within each circle represent the level of gene expression. (Credit: Jabaudon Lab/ UNIGE)Our brain is home to different