SLU Researchers Discover Structure of Protein Associated with Inflammation, Parkinson’s

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, Saint Louis University scientists report that they have determined the structure of a key protein that is involved in the body’s inflammatory response. This finding opens the door to developing new treatments for a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease, diabetes and cancer to neurodegenerative disorders, including

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapy

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat cancer. These therapies involve collecting a patient’s own immune cells — called T cells — and supercharging them to home in on and attack specific blood cancers, such as hard-to-treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But so far, these T

Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas

Recent research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrated that mature cells in the stomach sometimes revert back to behaving like rapidly dividing stem cells. Now, the researchers have found that this process may be universal; no matter the organ, when tissue responds to certain types of injury, mature cells seem to

February 22nd, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer|Tags: , , , |

Cutting off cervical cancer’s fuel supply stymies tumors

Cancer therapies have improved — in some cases dramatically — over the past two decades, but treatment for cervical cancer has remained largely unchanged. All patients receive radiation and chemotherapy, yet despite the aggressive approach, the regimen fails in about one-third of patients with cervical cancer that has spread beyond the cervix but not outside

February 15th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

Light-triggered nanoparticles show promise against metastatic cancer

A new anti-cancer strategy wields light as a precision weapon. Unlike traditional light therapy — which is limited to the skin and areas accessible with an endoscope — this technique can target and attack cancer cells that have spread deep inside the body, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

January 26th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

Audit Finds Reasons for Cancer Diagnosis Delays

Approximately one fifth of primary care patients with cancer in England experience some kind of delay in receiving a diagnosis. More than half of the delays are due to clinician-related or systemic factors, the results of a national audit reveal. The National Audit analyzed details for more than 17,000 patients diagnosed with cancer in 2014.

January 12th, 2018|Categories: Cancer, Disease Specific|

Study Prompts New Ideas on Cancers’ Origins

Rapidly dividing, yet aberrant stem cells are a major source of cancer. But a new study suggests that mature cells also play a key role in initiating cancer—a finding that could upend the way scientists think about the origin of the disease. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that

December 21st, 2017|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

FDA Approves First-of-a-Kind Test for Cancer Gene Profiling

U.S. regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind test that looks for mutations in hundreds of cancer genes at once, giving a more complete picture of what’s driving a patient’s tumor and aiding efforts to match treatments to those flaws. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Foundation Medicine’s test for patients with advanced or widely spread cancers, and

December 12th, 2017|Categories: Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |