Cerebral Palsy

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Robotic Exoskeleton Could Be Right Step Forward for Kids with Cerebral Palsy

More than 17 million people around the world are living with cerebral palsy, a movement disorder that occurs when motor areas of a child’s brain do not develop correctly or are damaged early in life. Many of those affected were born extremely prematurely and suffered brain hemorrhages shortly after birth. One of the condition’s most

As CIRM opens world’s largest stem cell bank, scientists ready their research

Sep 1, 2015 A $32 million public-private bank — where California researchers collect stem cells and scientists from around the world can make withdrawals — officially opened Tuesday with the aim of accelerating the use of engineered stem cells to tackle a wide range of diseases. The bank, funded by the California Institute for Regenerative

Interview with Dr. Charles Cox on New Stem Cell Trial for Cerebral Palsy

Knoepfler Lab Stem Cell Blog, by Paul Knoepfler ~ December 16, 2013 Dr. Charles Cox at the University of Texas (UT) Health Science Center at Houston is starting a new stem cell-based clinical trial for the treatment of young children with cerebral palsy (CP). There is an urgent need for the development of new treatments

Possible New Cord Cell Treatment for Cerebral Palsy

New umbilical cord blood cell-based treatments may offer hope for people living with cerebral palsy, notes an article in regional newspaper The Australian. Researchers gave 30 children with cerebral palsy a special treatment course, which included donated umbilical cord blood cells, for six months. As noted in the Stem Cells journal, these children saw significant improvements in brain and movement function. The

Young Pioneers Test Cord Blood’s Power to Heal

Saturday, April 2, 2011 By: Kate Hagan, The Sydney (Australia) Morning News Australian children with cerebral palsy will be offered a pioneering treatment using their own umbilical cord blood to provide some of the world's first evidence about its effectiveness at repairing damaged brain tissue. Researchers are seeking ethics approval for a trial at Melbourne's