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Coronary Calcium Helps Stratify 10-Year Cardiac Risk in Diabetes

IRVINE, CA — Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores may be better at predicting the risk of a cardiovascular disease (CVD) event in patients with type 2 diabetes than traditional scores such as Framingham, even in those who've had diabetes for 10 years, researchers report[1]. This conclusion is based on a new analysis of participants in

More Evidence Physical Activity Reduces Cardiovascular Risk

OXFORD, UK — A study of close to 500,000 people without cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline showed that total physical activity related to work, recreation, or utilitarian needs such as walking to do errands was associated with a lower short-term risk of developing CVD.[1] The researchers found that there is a "clearly positive . . . dose-response relationship between

December 3rd, 2017|Categories: Disease Specific, Heart Disease|Tags: , , |

Immune Cells Mistake Heart Attacks for Viral Infections

A study led by Kevin King, a bioengineer and physician at the University of California San Diego, has found that the immune system plays a surprising role in the aftermath of heart attacks. The research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for heart disease The team, which also includes researchers from the Center for Systems

Blood Cancer Gene Could be Key to Preventing Heart Failure

A new study, published today in Circulation, shows that the gene Runx1 increases in damaged heart muscle after a heart attack. An international collaboration led by researchers from the University of Glasgow, found that mice with a limited capacity to increase Runx1 gene activation were protected against the adverse changes that lead to heart failure. Coronary

Tension Makes the Heart Grow Stronger

By taking videos of a tiny beating zebrafish heart as it reconstructs its covering in a petri dish, scientists have captured unexpected dynamics of cells involved in tissue regeneration. They found that the depleted heart tissue regenerates itself in a wave, led by a front of fast-moving, supersized cells and trailed by smaller cells that

High Salt Intake Linked to Increased Heart-Failure Risk

BARCELONA, SPAIN — High daily salt intake is associated with a substantial increase in an individual's risk of developing heart failure, independent of other risk factors, suggests one of the largest studies to accurately measure salt consumption[1]. The analysis of more than 4500 individuals, presented here at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) 2017 Congress, indicated

September 12th, 2017|Categories: Disease Specific, Heart Disease|Tags: , |

Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementia

A large, long-term study suggests that middle aged Americans who have vascular health risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking, have a greater chance of suffering from dementia later in life. The study, published in JAMA Neurology, was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). “With an aging population, dementia is becoming

Scientists Link New Cancer Treatments to Cardiovascular Alterations

by Spanish National Cancer Research Centre Plk1 inhibitors have recently been acknowledged as an "Innovative Therapy for leukemia" by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). However, a study published in Nature Medicine by researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) suggests that prolonged use of these inhibitors can not only lead to

$10 million DNA sequencing effort aims to shed light on lung diseases

Research is part of national project to understand genetic roots of heart, lung, blood, sleep disorders by Julia Evangelou Strait Washington University’s McDonnell Genome Institute has received $10 million from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) to sequence the DNA of people from diverse ethnic backgrounds, in an effort to identify the genetic

Novel Surgical Technique Paves Way to Restoring Failing Organs

UCSF Study Shows Strategy May Boost Survival of Transplanted Stem Cells By Suzanne Leigh on May 14, 2017 By piercing liver cells with rapid pulses of electricity, scientists at UC San Francisco have demonstrated an entirely new way to transplant cells into organs to treat disease. Because the technique provides a hospitable environment for newly