Liver Disease

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Novel Surgical Technique Paves Way to Restoring Failing Organs

UCSF Study Shows Strategy May Boost Survival of Transplanted Stem Cells By Suzanne Leigh on May 14, 2017 By piercing liver cells with rapid pulses of electricity, scientists at UC San Francisco have demonstrated an entirely new way to transplant cells into organs to treat disease. Because the technique provides a hospitable environment for newly

Researchers Investigate New Treatments for Leading Cancers

WASHINGTON — January 02, 2017 12:56 AM Carol Pearson Scientists are investigating new ways of treating people with liver cancer. The methods range from developing an artificial liver, to seeing if genetically-modified pigs can produce organs compatible with humans. For those who have liver cancer, their only cure lies in a liver transplant or removal of the

As CIRM opens world’s largest stem cell bank, scientists ready their research

Sep 1, 2015 A $32 million public-private bank — where California researchers collect stem cells and scientists from around the world can make withdrawals — officially opened Tuesday with the aim of accelerating the use of engineered stem cells to tackle a wide range of diseases. The bank, funded by the California Institute for Regenerative

Newly Discovered Cells Regenerate Liver Tissue Without Forming Tumors

Hybrid hepatocytes proliferate and replenish liver mass after chronic liver injuries in mice August 13, 2015  |  Heather Buschman, PhD The mechanisms that allow the liver to repair and regenerate itself have long been a matter of debate. Now researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered a population of liver cells

UTSW Researchers Find Molecule Able to Accelerate Tissue Regeneration Upon Injury

July 20, 2015 Patricia Silva - A study recently published in the renowned journal Science revealed a molecule able to accelerate tissue regeneration after bone marrow transplantation and other tissue injuries in mice. The study is entitled “Inhibition of the prostaglandin-degrading enzyme 15-PGDH potentiates tissue regeneration” and was led by researchers at the University of

Organ transplant rejection may not be permanent

Organ transplant rejection in previously tolerant hosts does not lead to permanent immune memory, mouse study shows July 7, 2015 Rejection of transplanted organs in hosts that were previously tolerant may not be permanent, report scientists from the University of Chicago. Using a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, they found that immune tolerance can spontaneously

First steps in basic biological process that could be harnessed to make therapeutic cells

April 16, 2015Pioneer factor binding chromosomes is shown. Credit: Kenneth S. Zaret, Ph.D., Perelman School of Medicine, University of PennsylvaniaUnderstanding the molecular signals that guide early cells in the embryo to develop into different types of organs provides insight into how tissues regenerate and repair themselves. By knowing the principles that underlie the intricate steps

MSU team publishes findings about backup system that helps sustain liver during crisis

21/03/2015 02:35:00 By Evelyn Boswell, MSU News Service - BOZEMAN – Scientists from Montana State University and Sweden have discovered an antioxidant system that helps sustain the liver when other systems are missing or compromised. Like a generator kicking in when the power fails or an understudy taking the stage when a lead actor is sick,

Rebooting Cell Programming Can Reverse Liver Failure, Says Children’s Hospital/Pitt Study

PITTSBURGH, March 16, 2015 – It might be possible to heal cirrhotic liver disease by rebooting the genes that control liver cell function, according to researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. If validated in human studies, the game-changing strategy, described today in the online version

With Liver Donors in Short Supply, Cell Transplants Offer New Options

For many liver disease patients, implantation of a few new cells from a healthy organ may buy time or avoid a full transplant altogether February 17, 2015 |By Jessica Wapner A new approach may provide a stopgap or, in time, an entirely new alternative. Called hepatocyte transplantation, the technique replaces approximately 10 percent of the