Schizophrenia

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Discovery of a ‘Neuronal Big Bang’

Mon, 03/07/2016 - 11:07am University of Geneva This is an expression of all the genes of a neuron during the first hours after its birth. Each circle represents a development stage (6h, 12h, 24h), and the colored points within each circle represent the level of gene expression. (Credit: Jabaudon Lab/ UNIGE)Our brain is home to different

Receptors in brain linked to schizophrenia, autism

Mice lacking a set of receptors in one type of neuron in the brain developed compulsive, anti-social behaviors, Salk scientists found August 11, 2015 LA JOLLA–The loss of a critical receptor in a special class of inhibitory neurons in the brain may be responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders including autism and schizophrenia, according to new research

Focus on Research: Research gives new hope for restoring cells in damaged brains and spinal cords

An artist's rendition of a human spinal cord. Credit: EMSL CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE Centre Daily Times (CDT), January 17, 2015 — What motivates Penn State scientists and their students to devote countless hours trying to solve tough research mysteries? For Gong Chen, a biology professor at Penn State, the answer is rooted in a desire to

Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders

Washington University in St. Louis, by Jim Dreyden ~ September 15, 2014 New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The finding could be a first step toward improved diagnosis and treatment for the debilitating psychiatric illness. The research

Genetic mapping triggers new hope on schizophrenia

R&D, by Seth Borenstein, AP Writer ~ July 23, 2014 Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick. Such work could eventually point to new treatments, although they are many years away. Already, the new results

Uncovering Clues to the Genetic Cause of Schizophrenia

Bioscience Technology, Source: Columbia University Medical Center ~ May 29, 2014 The overall number and nature of mutations—rather than the presence of any single mutation—influences an individual’s risk of developing schizophrenia, as well as its severity, according to a study by Columbia University Medical Center researchers published in the latest issue of Neuron. The findings

New target explored for psychiatric drug development

Washington University in St. Louis, by Jim Dryden In a surprising discovery, neuroscientists have found that a breakdown product of cholesterol in the brain may be a target for developing new drugs to treat schizophrenia and other mental illnesses. Although the research is in its early stages, the finding comes at a crucial time. Most

‘Jumping Genes’ Linked to Schizophrenia

Science Magazine, by Emily Underwood ~ January 2, 2014 Roaming bits of DNA that can relocate and proliferate throughout the genome, called "jumping genes," may contribute to schizophrenia, a new study suggests. These rogue genetic elements pepper the brain tissue of deceased people with the disorder and multiply in response to stressful events, such as

Schizophrenia Tied To Abnormal Memory Network In Brain

Red Orbit, by Alan McStravick ~ October 16, 2013 Individuals suffering with schizophrenia are subject to a whole host of disturbing, life-changing symptoms. They can range from disorganized thinking and an inability to plan for the future to full-on hallucinations and paranoid delusions. Through treatment with psychiatric therapy and medication can be effective for some,