General News

Home/General News

Stem cells edited to fight arthritis

Goal is vaccine that targets inflammation in joints by Jim Dryden•April 27, 2017 ELLA MARUSHCHENKO Using CRISPR technology, a team of researchers led by Farshid Guilak, PhD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

April 26, 2017 (Nanowerk News) Ten years ago, the bones currently in your body did not actually exist. Like skin, bone is constantly renewing itself, shedding old tissue and growing it anew from stem cells in the bone marrow. Now, a new technique developed at Caltech can render intact bones transparent, allowing researchers to observe

Discovery could aid in development of treatments for fatal brain disease

Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun Huntington's disease is an inherited brain disorder that is uniformly fatal, but researchers at Johns Hopkins believe they have made a big discovery about how the disease progresses that could lead to a way to stop it. Their findings offer hope for a treatment to more than 30,000 Americans who have

Turning skin cells into blood vessel cells while keeping them young

April 6, 2017 - by Sharon Parmet Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a molecular switch that converts skin cells into cells that make up blood vessels, which could ultimately be used to repair damaged vessels in patients with heart disease or to engineer new vasculature in the lab. The technique, which

UC Davis licenses novel compound that helps stem cells regenerate bone to treat bone diseases

March 3, 2017 Hybrid molecule LLP2A-Alendronate could have implications for osteonecrosis, fractures, osteoporosis and inflammatory arthritis. The University of California, Davis, is pleased to announce a licensing agreement with Regenerative Arthritis and Bone Medicine, Inc. (RABOME) for a class of drugs developed at UC Davis that hold potential for treating diseases associated with bone loss

The Stem-Cell Revolution Is Coming — Slowly

By WALLACE RAVVEN JAN. 16, 2017 The New York Times In 2001, President George W. Bush issued an executive order banning federal funding for new sources of stem cells developed from preimplantation human embryos. The action stalled research and discouraged scientists. Five years later, a Kyoto University scientist, Shinya Yamanaka, and his graduate student, Kazutoshi

Stem cell therapy trial at Sanford first of its kind in U.S. for shoulder injuries

FDA-approved study explores utility of fat-derived stem cells SIOUX FALLS, S.D. – The first FDA-approved clinical trial of its kind in the United States using a person’s own fat-derived adult stem cells to treat shoulder injuries is available at Sanford Health. The trial opened in December and explores if adipose stem cells, which are taken

Using Fat to Help Wounds Heal Without Scars

Penn researchers help break ground on method to transform cells January 05, 2017 PHILADELPHIA – Doctors have found a way to manipulate wounds to heal as regenerated skin rather than scar tissue. The method involves transforming the most common type of cells found in wounds into fat cells – something that was previously thought to

Researchers Develop Novel Wound-Healing Technology

Tue, 11/29/2016 - 2:10pm by Washington State University A WSU research team has successfully used a mild electric current to take on and beat drug-resistant bacterial infections, a technology that may eventually be used to treat chronic wound infections. The researchers report on their work in the online edition of npj Biofilms and Microbiomes. Led by Haluk

Changing cell behavior could boost biofuels, medicine

By Beth Miller November 7, 2016 An engineer at Washington University in St. Louis developed an algorithm that suggests gene to remove from certain cells, such as yeast, to get them to perform a normal activity in a different environment or situation. A computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a way