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$7 million aimed at illuminating the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers working to identify genetic factors that raise, lower disease risk by Tamara Bhandari•March 13, 2017 OSCAR HARARI Studies are underway to identify the genetic networks that affect a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The researchers are aiming to find ways to predict who will develop the neurodegenerative disease, at what age and how

Researchers connect molecular function to high blood pressure, diseases

By Beth Miller March 1, 2017 Jianmin Cui’s lab investigated mechanisms of the an important ion channel called the BK channel, which is associated with high blood pressure, autism and movement disorders. By changing one small portion of a stimulus that influences part of one molecule’s function, engineers and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis

Researcher Finds Evidence Probiotics May Alleviate Progression of ALS

Feb 2, 2017 - KCU staff An imbalance of bacteria in the digestive tract may contribute to the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) according to new research led by KCU scientist Jingsong Zhou, PhD and Jun Sun, PhD of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Their preliminary research suggests probiotics could be a potential

February 2nd, 2017|Categories: ALS, Around The State|Tags: , , , |

Unraveling autism

A multifaceted approach aims to detect, treat and even reverse the disorder. BY REBECCA BOYLE, January 3, 2017 Washington University in St. Louis - Like many patients visiting a doctor’s office, Kim Sebenoler started out her appointment by heading to the nearest restroom to give a urine sample. But her visit to the lab of

Researchers Investigate New Treatments for Leading Cancers

WASHINGTON — January 02, 2017 12:56 AM Carol Pearson Scientists are investigating new ways of treating people with liver cancer. The methods range from developing an artificial liver, to seeing if genetically-modified pigs can produce organs compatible with humans. For those who have liver cancer, their only cure lies in a liver transplant or removal of the

New Drug Could Help Prevent Artery Disease in High-risk Patients

A recent study by researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine has shown that a protein inhibitor drug prevents these blockages, and could be a new therapeutic approach to prevent heart attack, stroke and other diseases caused by blocked blood vessels. Dec. 21, 2016- According to the American Heart Association, approximately 2,200 Americans

Landmark Alzheimer’s prevention trial to evaluate third drug

Effort to study drug's ability to prevent, delay the disease By Tamara Bhandari December 19, 2016 Washington University School of Medicine's Randall J. Bateman, MD, talks with DIAN-TU trial participant Natalie Shriver, of Omaha, about a study to test drugs that may prevent or delay Alzheimer's disease. (Photo: Robert Boston/Washington University School of Medicine) An

Nanotechnology a ‘green’ approach to treating liver cancer

November 29, 2016 (Nanowerk News) According to the American Cancer Society, more than 700,000 new cases of liver cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year. Currently, the only cure for the disease is to surgically remove the cancerous part of the liver or transplant the entire organ. However, an international study led by University of Missouri

New topical immunotherapy effective against early skin cancer

Combination of two drugs reduces precancerous skin lesions By Julia Evangelou Strait November 21, 2016 Washington University dermatologist Lynn Cornelius, MD, (left) conducts a skin exam with patient Robert Manchester. Manchester is a participant in a clinical trial testing the effectiveness of a new topical immunotherapy against precancerous skin lesions called actinic keratosis, often found

Researchers launch first clinical trial for Wolfram syndrome

Many people with rare genetic disease die prematurely by Jim Dryden•November 10, 2016 The drug dantrolene is a muscle relaxant approved to treat patients with cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and muscle spasticity. Recent research also suggests it can prevent the destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells in animal models of Wolfram syndrome. Researchers at Washington University