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New ALS therapy in clinical trials

About 20,000 people in the United States are living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. The invariably fatal disease kills the nerve cells that control walking, eating and breathing. Few people survive more than three years after diagnosis. Now, new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Brain cancer vaccine effective in some patients

Most people with the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma die less than 18 months after diagnosis. But a multicenter clinical trial of a personalized vaccine that targets the aggressive cancer has indicated improved survival rates for such patients. The study appears May 29 in the Journal of Translational Medicine. The phase three clinical trial included 331

Clinical Trial Targeting Lung Cancer, Plus Promising Osteoporosis and Incontinence Research get Support from Stem Cell Agency

The five-year survival rate for people diagnosed with the most advanced stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is between one and 10 percent. To address this devastating condition, the Board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) today voted to invest almost $12 million in a team from UCLA that is pioneering a

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complication

An investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what’s known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells

Eye implant made from stem cells could halt macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of blindness, affecting more than 10% of people over age 65 in developed countries. Drugs like Roche’s Lucentis, which plugs up leaky blood vessels in the eye that are characteristic of the “wet” form of the disease, can help, but there’s still a demand for

New way to fight sepsis: Rev up patients’ immune systems

While many people have never heard of sepsis, it causes about 250,000 deaths annually in the United States. The condition develops when an infection triggers an overwhelming immune response, ultimately wreaking havoc on the immune system. Standard treatment involves high doses of antibiotics that fight the infection, but they often don’t work well and fail

New Study Examines Investigational Drug Given Early to Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s

In a new multi-center Phase II/III clinical trial, Saint Louis University researchers will test the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug’s ability to slow the decline of brain function and possibly delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do not yet have symptoms of the illness. George Grossberg,

California’s Stem Cell Agency Invests in Phase 3 Clinical Trial to Help Kidney Transplant Patients

Over 650,000 Americans suffer from end-stage kidney disease - a life-threatening condition caused by the loss of kidney function. The best available treatment for these patients is a kidney transplant from a genetically matched, living donor. However, patients who receive a transplant must take life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent their immune system from rejecting the

January 19th, 2018|Categories: Clinical Trials, Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

Good News from Trio of Phase One Zika Vaccine Trials

In early results published in the Lancet, researchers report that an investigational Zika vaccine was well-tolerated and stimulated potentially protective immune responses in three phase 1 clinical trials, one of which was conducted at Saint Louis University. More than 90 percent of study volunteers in the three trials who received the investigational vaccine demonstrated an immune

December 7th, 2017|Categories: Around The State, Clinical Trials|Tags: , , |

NIH and partners launch HIV vaccine efficacy study

The National Institutes of Health and partners have launched a large clinical trial to assess whether an experimental HIV vaccine regimen is safe and able to prevent HIV infection. The new Phase 2b proof-of-concept study, called Imbokodo, aims to enroll 2,600 HIV-negative women in sub-Saharan Africa. Of 1.8 million new HIV infections worldwide in 2016,

December 1st, 2017|Categories: Clinical Trials, HIV|Tags: , |