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$7 million aimed at illuminating the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers working to identify genetic factors that raise, lower disease risk by Tamara Bhandari•March 13, 2017 OSCAR HARARI Studies are underway to identify the genetic networks that affect a person's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. The researchers are aiming to find ways to predict who will develop the neurodegenerative disease, at what age and how

Jumping Genes’ May Set the Stage for Brain Cell Death in Alzheimer’s, Other Diseases

 3/10/17 by Duke University Alzheimer's disease causes neurons in the brain to stop working, lose connections with other neurons and die. Duke University researchers have identified a molecular mechanism that may be responsible for setting the damage in motion. Alzheimer's disease causes neurons in the brain to stop working, lose connections with other neurons and

Alzheimer’s Staggering $259B Cost Could Break Medicare

Mar. 7, 2017 Bruce Japsen ,  CONTRIBUTOR The cost of providing care for Americans with Alzheimer’s disease has hit $259 billion–more than a quarter of a trillion dollars–as costs mount to treat more aging baby boomers entering long-term care facilities, according to a new report. The annual cost estimate for the deadly disease from the

UCSF researchers find key to ‘tired’ blood and immune systems

Aging of Blood-Forming Stem Cells Is Linked to Defect in Cellular Recycling Process By Jeff Norris on March 02, 2017 A molecular key to aging of the blood and immune system has been discovered in new research conducted at UC San Francisco, raising hope that it may be possible to find a way to slow

Researchers connect molecular function to high blood pressure, diseases

By Beth Miller March 1, 2017 Jianmin Cui’s lab investigated mechanisms of the an important ion channel called the BK channel, which is associated with high blood pressure, autism and movement disorders. By changing one small portion of a stimulus that influences part of one molecule’s function, engineers and researchers at Washington University in St. Louis

Novel ‘Barcode’ tracking T-cells in Immunotherapy Patients identifies likely cancer

Wed, 03/01/2017 - 10:17am by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center A new discovery by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle makes an important step in identifying which specific T cells within the diverse army of a person's immune system are best suited to fight cancer. The findings will be published February

Laser technique measures the stiffnes of cancer cells

Tue, 02/28/2017 - 3:03pm by Duke University Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered a way to detect signs of cancer on a cell-by-cell basis using two lasers and a camera. Several medical devices currently in use and in clinical trials around the world look for increases in cellular stiffness as an indicator of cancerous

How man’s best friend is helping cancer treatments

Mon, 02/27/2017 - 10:00am by Nicole Ehrhart, Colorado State University, The Conversation The author, center, and Dr. Anna Conti, left, and student Kelsey Parrish with Conti’s Basset hound, Picasso, who had surgery for cancer. (Via Colorado State University. William Cotton/CSU Photography, Author provided) “A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy

New technique generates high volume of sensory cells needed for hearing

FEBRUARY 21, 2017 A two-step process of multiplying stem cells found in the inner ear and converting them to hair cells may restore hearing lost to age, noise damage and other factors.Media Contact: Suzanne Day Media Relations Manager, Mass. Eye and Ear 617-573-3897 Boston, Mass. — The loss of tiny, sound-sensing cells in the inner ear, known as “hair

February 21st, 2017|Categories: Hearing|Tags: , , , |

Researcher Finds Evidence Probiotics May Alleviate Progression of ALS

Feb 2, 2017 - KCU staff An imbalance of bacteria in the digestive tract may contribute to the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) according to new research led by KCU scientist Jingsong Zhou, PhD and Jun Sun, PhD of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Their preliminary research suggests probiotics could be a potential

February 2nd, 2017|Categories: ALS, Around The State|Tags: , , , |