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Gene therapy method developed to target damaged kidney cells

Gene therapy has gained momentum in the past year, following the federal government’s approval of the first such treatments for inherited retinal diseases and hard-to-treat leukemia. Now, research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown, in mice, that genetic material can be delivered to damaged cells in the kidneys, a key step

Can fasting improve MS symptoms?

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) can find an abundance of conflicting advice suggesting that special diets – everything from avoiding processed foods to going low-carb – will ease their symptoms. But the evidence is scanty that dietary changes can improve fatigue or other MS symptoms. “People hear these miraculous stories about patients recovering the ability

Link Found between Neurotransmitter Imbalance, Brain Connectivity and Language Processing in Individuals with Autism

One in 59 children in the United States lives with a form of autism spectrum disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The signs of autism begin in early childhood and can affect individuals differently. However, many with autism share similar symptoms, including difficulties with social communication. Researchers from the University of

Genes linked to Alzheimer’s contribute to damage in different ways

Multiple genes are implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Some are linked to early-onset Alzheimer’s, a condition that develops in one’s 30s, 40s and 50s, while others are associated with the more common late-onset form of the disease. Eventually, all Alzheimer’s patients develop dementia, and their brain cells die. But not all genes linked to the disease

Scientists ID source of damaging inflammation after heart attack

Scientists have zeroed in on a culprit that spurs damaging inflammation in the heart following a heart attack. The guilty party is a type of immune cell that tries to heal the injured heart but instead triggers inflammation that leads to even more damage. Further, the researchers have found that an already approved drug effectively

MU researchers find clues to treating psychoses in mental health patients

Psychotic disorders often are severe and involve extreme symptoms such as delusions or hallucinations in which people lose their sense of reality. Researchers at the University of Missouri recently found evidence that boosting how well people at risk for psychosis learn from positive and negative feedback could potentially keep psychosis at bay. The team also found

New tools could uncover important answers for Alzheimer’s researchers

Alzheimer’s disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist that researchers could use to study this devastating disorder. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Missouri,

Brain cancer vaccine effective in some patients

Most people with the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma die less than 18 months after diagnosis. But a multicenter clinical trial of a personalized vaccine that targets the aggressive cancer has indicated improved survival rates for such patients. The study appears May 29 in the Journal of Translational Medicine. The phase three clinical trial included 331

Clinical Trial Targeting Lung Cancer, Plus Promising Osteoporosis and Incontinence Research get Support from Stem Cell Agency

The five-year survival rate for people diagnosed with the most advanced stage of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is between one and 10 percent. To address this devastating condition, the Board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) today voted to invest almost $12 million in a team from UCLA that is pioneering a

SLU Scientist Aims to Turn on Hypoglycemia’s Missed Signal

A $150,000 grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust will support research at Saint Louis University led by scientist Gina Yosten, Ph.D. Yosten’s team is pursuing solutions for people with diabetes who are at risk of life-threatening drops in blood sugar known as hypoglycemia. “This project is focused on a very