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New Study Examines Investigational Drug Given Early to Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s

In a new multi-center Phase II/III clinical trial, Saint Louis University researchers will test the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug’s ability to slow the decline of brain function and possibly delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do not yet have symptoms of the illness. George Grossberg,

Body clock disruptions occur years before memory loss in Alzheimer’s

People with Alzheimer’s disease are known to have disturbances in their internal body clocks that affect the sleep/wake cycle and may increase risk of developing the disorder. Now, new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that such circadian rhythm disruptions also occur much earlier in people whose memories are intact

Lack of sleep boosts levels of Alzheimer’s proteins

Have you resolved to take better care of yourself in the new year? Here’s a relatively painless way to do it: Catch a few more zzz’s every night. A third of American adults don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic poor sleep has been linked to cognitive decline,

New Clues to Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers probing the complexities of Alzheimer’s disease have detected issues involving cellular energy production, and those problems may be an important contributor to the late-onset form of the illness. A team at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital tested the cells of late-onset Alzheimer’s patients and found malfunctions in their energy production, including problems with the health of

December 13th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's/Dementia, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

New forecast shows 6 million with Alzheimer’s disease, cognitive impairment

Using new methodology, scientists calculate that approximately 6 million American adults have Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment, which can sometimes be a precursor to the disease. The estimate, funded by the National Institutes of Health, also forecasts that these numbers will more than double to 15 million by 2060, as the population ages. The

Alzheimer’s damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE gene

People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta. “Scientists have been interested in APOE

Brain activity ripples linked to creation of long-term memories

While we’re asleep, the brain is working to store new information as long-term memories. Storing a memory likely involves interactions between the brain’s hippocampus and parts of the cortex. Scientists have been trying to determine the precise connections by examining electrical activity within these regions of the brain. When hundreds or thousands of nerve cells,

November 25th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's/Dementia, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

Higher brain glucose levels may mean more severe Alzheimer’s

For the first time, scientists have found a connection between abnormalities in how the brain breaks down glucose and the severity of the signature amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain, as well as the onset of eventual outward symptoms, of Alzheimer’s disease. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part

Research: Vaccinating Against Psoriasis, Allergies and Alzheimer’s a Possibility

Research from the Universities of Dundee and Oxford has shown how combining the tetanus vaccine with a viral particle that normally affects cucumbers can be used to treat psoriasis and allergies, and may even protect against Alzheimer's disease. Scientists led by Dundee's Dr John Foerster and Oxford's Professor Martin Bachmann, were able to take the

Alzheimer’s gene poses both risk — and benefits

Scientists drilling down to the molecular roots of Alzheimer’s disease have encountered a good news/bad news scenario. A major player is a gene called TREM2, mutations of which can substantially raise a person’s risk of the disease. The bad news is that in the early stages of the disease, high-risk TREM2 variants can hobble the