Cancer

UCSF researchers find key to ‘tired’ blood and immune systems

Aging of Blood-Forming Stem Cells Is Linked to Defect in Cellular Recycling Process By Jeff Norris on March 02, 2017 A molecular key to aging of the blood and immune system has been discovered in new research conducted at UC San Francisco, raising hope that it may be possible to find a way to slow

Novel ‘Barcode’ tracking T-cells in Immunotherapy Patients identifies likely cancer

Wed, 03/01/2017 - 10:17am by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center A new discovery by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle makes an important step in identifying which specific T cells within the diverse army of a person's immune system are best suited to fight cancer. The findings will be published February

Laser technique measures the stiffnes of cancer cells

Tue, 02/28/2017 - 3:03pm by Duke University Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered a way to detect signs of cancer on a cell-by-cell basis using two lasers and a camera. Several medical devices currently in use and in clinical trials around the world look for increases in cellular stiffness as an indicator of cancerous

How man’s best friend is helping cancer treatments

Mon, 02/27/2017 - 10:00am by Nicole Ehrhart, Colorado State University, The Conversation The author, center, and Dr. Anna Conti, left, and student Kelsey Parrish with Conti’s Basset hound, Picasso, who had surgery for cancer. (Via Colorado State University. William Cotton/CSU Photography, Author provided) “A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy

Researchers Investigate New Treatments for Leading Cancers

WASHINGTON — January 02, 2017 12:56 AM Carol Pearson Scientists are investigating new ways of treating people with liver cancer. The methods range from developing an artificial liver, to seeing if genetically-modified pigs can produce organs compatible with humans. For those who have liver cancer, their only cure lies in a liver transplant or removal of the

Cellular immunotherapy targets a common human cancer mutation

December 7, 2016 In a study of an immune therapy for colorectal cancer that involved a single patient, a team of researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) identified a method for targeting the cancer-causing protein produced by a mutant form of the KRAS gene. This targeted immunotherapy led to cancer regression in the patient

Nanotechnology a ‘green’ approach to treating liver cancer

November 29, 2016 (Nanowerk News) According to the American Cancer Society, more than 700,000 new cases of liver cancer are diagnosed worldwide each year. Currently, the only cure for the disease is to surgically remove the cancerous part of the liver or transplant the entire organ. However, an international study led by University of Missouri

New topical immunotherapy effective against early skin cancer

Combination of two drugs reduces precancerous skin lesions By Julia Evangelou Strait November 21, 2016 Washington University dermatologist Lynn Cornelius, MD, (left) conducts a skin exam with patient Robert Manchester. Manchester is a participant in a clinical trial testing the effectiveness of a new topical immunotherapy against precancerous skin lesions called actinic keratosis, often found

Lab-Grown Human ‘Mini Lungs’ Successfully Engraft in Mice, a Respiratory Research Breakthrough

Shantell M. Kirkendoll November 07, 2016 6:00 AM Scientists can now grow 3-D models of various organs from stem cells, creating new ways to study disease. More than a year ago, scientists made studying lung cells in a petri dish appear old-fashioned. A team led by University of Michigan Medical School researchers coaxed stem cells to

Making Every Cell Matter

October 31, 2016 A new method for encapsulating single cells within tunable microgels could boost efficacy of cell-based therapies and tissue engineering (CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts) – Alginate hydrogels – which are derived from the polysaccharide found in brown seaweed – have emerged as an effective material for manipulating cells and tissues due to their biocompatibility and