Kidney Disease

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Gene therapy method developed to target damaged kidney cells

Gene therapy has gained momentum in the past year, following the federal government’s approval of the first such treatments for inherited retinal diseases and hard-to-treat leukemia. Now, research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown, in mice, that genetic material can be delivered to damaged cells in the kidneys, a key step

California’s Stem Cell Agency Invests in Phase 3 Clinical Trial to Help Kidney Transplant Patients

Over 650,000 Americans suffer from end-stage kidney disease - a life-threatening condition caused by the loss of kidney function. The best available treatment for these patients is a kidney transplant from a genetically matched, living donor. However, patients who receive a transplant must take life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent their immune system from rejecting the

January 19th, 2018|Categories: Clinical Trials, Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

New Cellular Approach Found to Control Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that extracellular vesicles - tiny protein-filled structures - isolated from amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) can be used to effectively slow the progression of kidney damage in mice with a type of chronic kidney disease. The findings, by a research team at the Saban Research Institute of Children's

Kidney disease increases risk of diabetes, study shows

Diabetes is known to increase a person’s risk of kidney disease. Now, a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that the converse also is true: Kidney dysfunction increases the risk of diabetes. Further, the researchers deduced that a likely culprit of the two-way relationship between kidney disease and diabetes

Researchers turn to creative approaches to battle kidney stones

Can a high-tech water bottle help reduce the recurrence of kidney stones? What about a financial incentive? Those are questions researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health will seek to answer as they begin recruiting participants for a two-year clinical trial at four sites across the country. Scientists will test whether using a smart

September 15th, 2017|Categories: Clinical Trials, Kidney Disease|Tags: |

Engineering human stem cells to model the kidney’s filtration barrier on a chip

May 10, 2017 A glomerulus-on-a-chip lined by human stem cell-derived kidney cells could help model patient-specific kidney diseases and guide therapeutic discovery By Benjamin Boettner (BOSTON) — The kidney – made up of about a million tiny units that work to filter blood, constantly rids the body of undesired waste products to form urine while

Scientists find culprit responsible for calcified blood vessels in kidney disease

Stem cell finding informs research to prevent hardening of arteries By Julia Evangelou Strait September 8, 2016 A new study indicates that stem cells called Gli1 cells (shown in red) are responsible for depositing calcium in the arteries, increasing the risk of atherosclerosis. Over time, the condition can lead to cardiovascular disease and is especially

Bioengineered Blood Vessel Shows Early Promise for Dialysis Patients

Fri, 05/13/2016 - 9:12am Duke University Man-made blood vessels developed by researchers at Duke University, Yale University and the tissue engineering company Humacyte appear to be both safe and more durable than commonly used synthetic versions in patients undergoing kidney dialysis, the researchers report. The findings, published May 12 in The Lancet, resulted from a

Good as gold​​​

Precious metal, artificial antibodies combine for kidney injury test October 22, 2015 By Erika Ebsworth-GooldGold is one of the world’s best-known precious metals. For thousands of years, it’s been crafted into jewelry, medals and coins. When mixed with alloys, it can take on a white or rose-colored cast, but its natural hue is a deep, rich,

Yale scientists develop novel technique for kidney research

By Ziba Kashef August 24, 2015 One in four patients treated with the widely used anti-cancer drug cisplatin develop chronic kidney disease. To better understand how the treatment leads to kidney damage, and possibly prevent it, a team of researchers at Yale School of Medicine developed a new 3D-imaging technique to peer deep into these