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Implantable, biodegradable devices speed nerve regeneration in rats

Car accidents, sports injuries, even too much typing and texting can injure the peripheral nerves, leaving people with numbness, tingling and weakness in their hands, arms or legs. Recovery can take months, and doctors have little to offer to speed it along. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Northwestern

October 8th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Disease Specific|Tags: |

Surgery Remains Best Option for Rare Bladder Cancer

In a recent paper published in the World Journal of Urology, Saint Louis University researchers reviewed data for patients with a rare type of bladder cancer, examining the treatments they received and the subsequent five-year-survival rates. Zachary Hamilton, M.D., assistant professor of urologic surgery at SLU and a SLUCare urologic oncologist, reports that surgery for

September 28th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , |

SLU Researcher Receives $2.3 Million NIH Grant to Expand Youth-Friendly HIV Self-Testing

Nigerian youth are at the epicenter of an expanding HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa. As a country, Nigeria ranks second in the in the world in new HIV-Infections among youth, youth living with HIV and AIDS-related death among a youth population. HIV testing is an important early entry point to accessing preventive education, care and

September 25th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Disease Specific, HIV|Tags: , , , |

New clues found to understanding relapse in breast cancer

A large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of British Columbia. The knowledge could

September 20th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer|Tags: , |

Scientists identify weak point in deadly eye melanoma

A natural plant compound exploits a newly identified Achilles’ heel in a cancer of the eye, uveal melanoma. In human cancer cells growing in the lab, the compound shuts down the overactive signaling that drives uveal melanoma cell growth, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study is published

September 20th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

Alzheimer’s one day may be predicted during eye exam

It may be possible in the future to screen patients for Alzheimer’s disease using an eye exam. Using technology similar to what is found in many eye doctors’ offices, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have detected evidence suggesting Alzheimer’s in older patients who had no symptoms of the disease. Their

Lasers help fight deadly brain tumors

People diagnosed with the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma face a grim prognosis. Half die within 14 months of diagnosis. Even if initial treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy is successful, such brain tumors typically recur, leaving patients with few options. Now, a research team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found

New approach to developing antidepressants

An estimated 13 percent of Americans take antidepressant drugs for depression, anxiety, chronic pain or sleep problems. For the 14 million Americans who have clinical depression, roughly one third don’t find relief with antidepressants. But now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Sage Therapeutics in Boston are trying a different

August 20th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Depression|Tags: , , , |