Sickle Cell

Sickle Cell Disease: Gene-Editing Tools Point to Possible Ultimate Cure

Posted on October 25, 2016 by Dr. Francis Collins Caption: An electron micrograph showing two red blood cells, one normal (right) and the other (left) deformed by crystalline hemoglobin into the “sickle” shape characteristic of patients with sickle cell disease. Credit: Frans Kuypers: RBClab.com, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland Scientists first described the sickle-shaped red

BCL11A-based gene therapy for sickle cell disease passes key preclinical test

September 06, 2016 Decades-old discovery about fetal hemoglobin is on track for clinical trial in the coming year A precision-engineered gene therapy virus, inserted into blood stem cells that are then transplanted, markedly reduced sickle-induced red-cell damage in mice with sickle cell disease, researchers from Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center report today in

Blood-forming stem cells likely hold the key to curing many types of disease

Science Friday July 20, 2016 · 7:45 AM EDT By Adam Wernick Researchers at Stanford are reviving a technique that can use uncontaminated, blood-forming stem cells to treat a patient with cancer, autoimmune deficiency and other diseases. Beginning in the 1960s, hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells became the basis for bone marrow transplants used to treat cancer patients. Then, in the 1980s and

Making bone marrow transplants safer

New approach would use antibodies rather than radiation and chemotherapy June 7, 2016 | Editor's Pick Popular  By Hannah L. Robbins, Harvard Stem Cell Institute B.D. Colen/Harvard Stem Cell Institute Communications Rahul Palchaudhuri (left), postdoctoral fellow, and David Scadden, co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, look at real-time images of blood stem cells settling

Calgary doctors develop new stem-cell transplant procedure to cure children with sickle cell anemia

Published on: June 6, 2016 | Last Updated: June 6, 2016 7:23 PM MDT by Alia Dharssi Cardelia Fox, centre, with her sister Tamika Allen and Dr. Greg Guilcher at the Children's Hospital on Monday June 6, 2016. Cardelia suffered from sickle cell anemia and was treated by Dr. Guilcher with stem cells from her

Researcher finds novel way to monitor serious blood disorder using a smart phone

Sept. 22, 2015 Eureka Alert! Gisele Galoustian Florida Atlantic University receives NSF grant A researcher from Florida Atlantic University has come up with a unique way to monitor sickle cell disease -- a serious blood disorder -- using a smart phone. With a $166,935 grant from the National Science Foundation, E. (Sarah) Du, Ph.D., assistant professor

Lab-produced blood cells set for human trials in landmark project involving Cambridge scientists

CambridgeNews  |  Posted: June 25, 2015 By Freya Leng NHSBT Blood Van Cambridge scientists are involved in a landmark project that will see red blood cells produced in the laboratory transfused into humans by 2017, NHS Blood and Transplant has announced. The in-man clinical trials of manufactured blood form a key part of the blood and

MGH gives grant to low-cost sickle cell diagnostic

Mar 31, 2015 Jessica Bartlett Reporter-Boston Business Journal Massachusetts General Hospital’s Center for Global Health is helping to fund an affordable sickle cell diagnostic, awarding $100,000 to the Whitesides Research Group. Courtesy/Whitesides Research Group A density test can tell whether someone has sickle cell disease. The team, led by Harvard University Chemistry Professor George Whitesides, has been working

Sickle Cell Drug Offers “Overwhelming” Gains as “Exciting” Stem Cell Trial Starts

Mon, 03/16/2015 - 3:58pm Cynthia Fox, Science Editor Normal blood cells next to a sickle-blood cell, colored scanning electron microscope image (Credit: OpenStax College)A clinical trial of the most common sickle cell anemia drug, hydroxyurea, was halted a year early this winter because of “overwhelming evidence of benefit,” reported University of Nebraska Medical Center pediatric

Johns Hopkins researchers engineer custom blood cells

Step toward new treatment for patients with sickle cell disease March 9, 2015 JOHNS HOPKINS MEDICINE Researchers at Johns Hopkins have successfully corrected a genetic error in stem cells from patients with sickle cell disease, and then used those cells to grow mature red blood cells, they report. The study represents an important step toward