Alzheimer’s

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Genes linked to Alzheimer’s contribute to damage in different ways

Multiple genes are implicated in Alzheimer’s disease. Some are linked to early-onset Alzheimer’s, a condition that develops in one’s 30s, 40s and 50s, while others are associated with the more common late-onset form of the disease. Eventually, all Alzheimer’s patients develop dementia, and their brain cells die. But not all genes linked to the disease

New tools could uncover important answers for Alzheimer’s researchers

Alzheimer’s disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist that researchers could use to study this devastating disorder. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Missouri,

Saliva Testing, Ibuprofen May Aid Alzheimer’s Prevention

Saliva testing of amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) levels may contribute to the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by determining AD risk and guidance on the use of prophylactic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new research suggests. Canadian investigators used a salivary ELISA test to measure Aβ42 levels in saliva. They found that elevations in Aβ42 levels in persons at risk for

Link between 2 key Alzheimer’s proteins explained

It’s a paradox of Alzheimer’s disease: Plaques of the sticky protein amyloid beta are the most characteristic sign in the brain of the deadly neurodegenerative disease. However, many older people have such plaques in their brains but do not have dementia. The memory loss and confusion of Alzheimer’s instead is associated with tangles of a

New Study Examines Investigational Drug Given Early to Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s

In a new multi-center Phase II/III clinical trial, Saint Louis University researchers will test the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug’s ability to slow the decline of brain function and possibly delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do not yet have symptoms of the illness. George Grossberg,

Lack of sleep boosts levels of Alzheimer’s proteins

Have you resolved to take better care of yourself in the new year? Here’s a relatively painless way to do it: Catch a few more zzz’s every night. A third of American adults don’t get enough sleep, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic poor sleep has been linked to cognitive decline,

New Clues to Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers probing the complexities of Alzheimer’s disease have detected issues involving cellular energy production, and those problems may be an important contributor to the late-onset form of the illness. A team at Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital tested the cells of late-onset Alzheimer’s patients and found malfunctions in their energy production, including problems with the health of

December 13th, 2017|Categories: Alzheimer's/Dementia, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

Alzheimer’s damage in mice reduced with compound that targets APOE gene

People who carry the APOE4 genetic variant face a substantial risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a compound that targets the APOE protein in the brains of mice and protects against damage induced by the Alzheimer’s protein amyloid beta. “Scientists have been interested in APOE

Higher brain glucose levels may mean more severe Alzheimer’s

For the first time, scientists have found a connection between abnormalities in how the brain breaks down glucose and the severity of the signature amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain, as well as the onset of eventual outward symptoms, of Alzheimer’s disease. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part

Lithium in Drinking Water May Lower Dementia Risk

Higher long-term lithium exposure from drinking water may be associated with a lower incidence of dementia, a large population-based study suggests. "This is the first study ever investigating the association between lithium in drinking water and onset of dementia," Lars Vedel Kessing, MD, DMSc, from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, told Medscape Medical News. "If