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In autism, too many brain connections may be at root of condition

A defective gene linked to autism influences how neurons connect and communicate with each other in the brain, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Rodents that lack the gene form too many connections between brain neurons and have difficulty learning. The findings, published Nov. 2 in Nature Communications,

November 9th, 2017|Categories: Around The State, Autism, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

Higher brain glucose levels may mean more severe Alzheimer’s

For the first time, scientists have found a connection between abnormalities in how the brain breaks down glucose and the severity of the signature amyloid plaques and tangles in the brain, as well as the onset of eventual outward symptoms, of Alzheimer’s disease. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), part

New Class of Molecules Protect Neural Cell Integrity Upon Injury

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans, has discovered a new class of molecules in the brain that synchronize cell-to-cell communication and neuroinflammation/immune activity in response to injury or diseases. Elovanoids (ELVs) are bioactive chemical messengers made from omega-3 very

October 15th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , , , |

Virtual Brain Lab Brings Together World-leading Neuroscientists

Twenty-one leading neuroscience groups from around the world, including seven from UCL, have formed a "virtual brain lab" to test how the brain controls learning and decision making. The £10 million International Brain Lab brings together groups from UK, USA, France, Switzerland and Portugal to uncover how complex networks of brain cells support our ability to

October 14th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , |

Memory For Details Matures Gradually

In contrast to previous assumptions, the hippocampus, a brain structure that is central to learning and memory, does not complete its maturation until adolescence. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, and the University of Stirling were able to show this for

October 8th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , |

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells

While Zika virus causes devastating damage to the brains of developing fetuses, it one day may be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine shows that the virus kills brain

SLU Surgeons Study ‘Awake Aneurysm Surgery’ for Better Outcomes

In a first time study published in the August edition of the Journal of Neurosurgery, Saint Louis University surgeons and researchers report that the use of conscious sedation – also called “awake brain surgery” – allowed them to make adjustments mid-surgery to lower risks during aneurysm surgery. The research was led by Saleem Abdulrauf, M.D.,

August 21st, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |

Anxious? Cellular roots of anxiety identified

From students stressing over exams to workers facing possible layoffs, worrying about the future is a normal and universal experience. But when people’s anticipation of bad things to come starts interfering with daily life, ordinary worry can turn into an anxiety disorder. About one in four adults will struggle with anxiety at some point in

Waterlogged brain region helps scientists gauge damage caused by Parkinson’s disease

Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease, which destroys neurons important for movement. The development suggests that fluid changes in a specific brain area could provide a way to track that damage. The study, published in the journal Brain, was supported by

Gene changes may increase risk of Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder that is usually diagnosed in childhood. It causes repetitive, involuntary movements or noises called tics. Many with Tourette syndrome experience other problems including inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, as well as obsessive-compulsive symptoms such as intrusive thoughts and worries. Symptoms are usually worst during the early teen years, with improvements