brain

Home/Tag:brain

Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells

While Zika virus causes devastating damage to the brains of developing fetuses, it one day may be an effective treatment for glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine shows that the virus kills brain

SLU Surgeons Study ‘Awake Aneurysm Surgery’ for Better Outcomes

In a first time study published in the August edition of the Journal of Neurosurgery, Saint Louis University surgeons and researchers report that the use of conscious sedation – also called “awake brain surgery” – allowed them to make adjustments mid-surgery to lower risks during aneurysm surgery. The research was led by Saleem Abdulrauf, M.D.,

August 21st, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , |

Anxious? Cellular roots of anxiety identified

From students stressing over exams to workers facing possible layoffs, worrying about the future is a normal and universal experience. But when people’s anticipation of bad things to come starts interfering with daily life, ordinary worry can turn into an anxiety disorder. About one in four adults will struggle with anxiety at some point in

Waterlogged brain region helps scientists gauge damage caused by Parkinson’s disease

Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson’s disease, which destroys neurons important for movement. The development suggests that fluid changes in a specific brain area could provide a way to track that damage. The study, published in the journal Brain, was supported by

Gene changes may increase risk of Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a neurological disorder that is usually diagnosed in childhood. It causes repetitive, involuntary movements or noises called tics. Many with Tourette syndrome experience other problems including inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity, as well as obsessive-compulsive symptoms such as intrusive thoughts and worries. Symptoms are usually worst during the early teen years, with improvements

Brain Patterns at 6 Months Predict Autism in High-Risk Infants

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of brain connectivity in 6-month-old infants at high risk for autism successfully identified 9 of 11 babies who went on to be diagnosed with the disorder at 24 months of age, according to findings published online today in Science Translational Medicine. Moreover, the imaging data correctly categorized all 48 of

June 15th, 2017|Categories: Autism|Tags: , , , , , |

Even Moderate Alcohol Consumption May Harm the Brain

Source: Even Moderate Alcohol Consumption May Harm the Brain - Medscape - Jun 07, 2017. By Fran Lowry Moderate drinking is associated with pathologic findings in the brain, including hippocampal atrophy, vs no drinking, new research shows. Higher alcohol intake also predicted faster decline in cognitive measures of lexical fluency, although not semantic fluency or word recall, researchers found. "In this

June 13th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , , , |

Researchers find the organization of the human brain to be nearly ideal

Wed, 07/08/2015 - 9:57am Northeastern University Krioukov and his colleagues discovered that the structure of the human brain has an almost ideal network of connections (magenta), enabling optimal transmission of information from one part of the brain to another. Image: KrioukovHave you ever wondered why the human brain evolved the way it did?A new study by

Scientists Gain First Glimpse of New Concepts Developing in the Brain

Wed, 06/10/2015 - 9:57am by Carnegie Mellon University Thanks to Carnegie Mellon University advances in brain imaging technology, we now know how specific concrete objects are coded in the brain, to the point where we can identify which object, such as a house or a banana, someone is thinking about from its brain activation signature. Now,