CRISPR

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Gene Editing: Innovation and Impact in Missouri

Missouri Cures Educational Foundation, Benson Hill, and The Donald Danforth Plant and Science Center proudly present Gene Editing: Innovation and Impact in Missouri. Please join us as renowned panelists come together to discuss cutting-edge gene editing technology; how it will help improve human health, grow the food we need with fewer resources, manage environmental changes,

New approach to developing antidepressants

An estimated 13 percent of Americans take antidepressant drugs for depression, anxiety, chronic pain or sleep problems. For the 14 million Americans who have clinical depression, roughly one third don’t find relief with antidepressants. But now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Sage Therapeutics in Boston are trying a different

August 20th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Depression|Tags: , , , |

Sickle-Cell Patients See Hope in CRISPR

Hertz Nazaire is a soft-spoken artist who likes to paint in bright colors, with subjects like rainbow palm leaves and dancing women in twirling skirts. But one series of paintings he’s created is darker. Here, deep-red discs contrast with misshapen, bluish-purple ones against a black background. One canvas shows an African face drowning in the

April 12th, 2018|Categories: Disease Specific, Sickle Cell|Tags: , |

CRISPR enhances gene therapy to fight inherited diseases

Gene therapy has shown promise in treating inherited genetic diseases, but a major issue that has frustrated scientists remains: Replacing a “bad” gene with a healthy one often is a short-lived fix. Typically, the healthy replacement gene works for just a few weeks. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have

April 3rd, 2018|Categories: Around The State, General News|Tags: , , |

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapy

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat cancer. These therapies involve collecting a patient’s own immune cells — called T cells — and supercharging them to home in on and attack specific blood cancers, such as hard-to-treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But so far, these T

A CRISPR cure for Huntington’s?

The gene editing system CRISPR-Cas9 has generated excitement in scientific circles for its potential to cure diseases caused by a single defective gene, including the progressive neurological disorder Huntington’s. But editing genes with this technology is risky because cutting strands of DNA can lead to unintentional gene edits, causing dangerous off-target effects. Scientists at the Institute

CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndrome

Using the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells. The research, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, suggests new lines of investigation into how to treat this condition — dyskeratosis congenita —

August 2nd, 2017|Categories: Around The State|Tags: , , , |

Stem cells edited to fight arthritis

Goal is vaccine that targets inflammation in joints by Jim Dryden•April 27, 2017 ELLA MARUSHCHENKO Using CRISPR technology, a team of researchers led by Farshid Guilak, PhD, at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, rewired stem cells' genetic circuits to produce an anti-inflammatory arthritis drug when the cells encounter inflammation. The technique eventually

Genetic error that increases risk of aortic rupture identified

Study sheds light on unexplained enlargement, weakening of aorta By Julia Evangelou Strait July 18, 2016 In young people, aortic aneurysms are most often caused by an inherited condition,such as Marfan syndrome. Standard genetic tests often pinpoint the reason for inheritedaortic disease, but some cases remain medical mysteries. A new study adds lysyl oxidaseto the

CRISPR Used to Repair Blindness-causing Genetic Defect in Patient-derived Stem Cells

A potential precision medicine approach for treating vision loss January 27, 2016 Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at