gene-editing

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Gene Editing: Innovation and Impact in Missouri

Missouri Cures Educational Foundation, Benson Hill, and The Donald Danforth Plant and Science Center proudly present Gene Editing: Innovation and Impact in Missouri. Please join us as renowned panelists come together to discuss cutting-edge gene editing technology; how it will help improve human health, grow the food we need with fewer resources, manage environmental changes,

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapy

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat cancer. These therapies involve collecting a patient’s own immune cells — called T cells — and supercharging them to home in on and attack specific blood cancers, such as hard-to-treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But so far, these T

A CRISPR cure for Huntington’s?

The gene editing system CRISPR-Cas9 has generated excitement in scientific circles for its potential to cure diseases caused by a single defective gene, including the progressive neurological disorder Huntington’s. But editing genes with this technology is risky because cutting strands of DNA can lead to unintentional gene edits, causing dangerous off-target effects. Scientists at the Institute

New gene-editing technology partially restores vision in blind animals

November 16, 2016Salk researchers have discovered, for the first time, how to place DNA in specific locations in non-dividing cells LA JOLLA—Salk Institute researchers have discovered a holy grail of gene editing—the ability to, for the first time, insert DNA at a target location into the non-dividing cells that make up the majority of adult

November 16th, 2016|Categories: Blindness|Tags: , , , , |

Sickle Cell Disease: Gene-Editing Tools Point to Possible Ultimate Cure

Posted on October 25, 2016 by Dr. Francis Collins Caption: An electron micrograph showing two red blood cells, one normal (right) and the other (left) deformed by crystalline hemoglobin into the “sickle” shape characteristic of patients with sickle cell disease. Credit: Frans Kuypers: RBClab.com, UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland Scientists first described the sickle-shaped red

CRISPR Used to Repair Blindness-causing Genetic Defect in Patient-derived Stem Cells

A potential precision medicine approach for treating vision loss January 27, 2016 Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at

Gene-editing technique offers hope for hereditary diseases

Salk scientists use molecular "scissors" to eliminate mitochondrial mutations in eggs and embryos April 23, 2015 LA JOLLA–For thousands of women around the globe carrying a mitochondrial disease, having a healthy child can be a gamble. This set of diseases affect mitochondria, tiny powerhouses that generate energy in the body’s cells and are passed exclusively from

April 23rd, 2015|Categories: General News|Tags: , , , |