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New tools could uncover important answers for Alzheimer’s researchers

Alzheimer’s disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist that researchers could use to study this devastating disorder. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Missouri,

Genetic lung disease’s molecular roots identified

Respiratory infections peak during the winter months, and most people recover within a few weeks. But for those with a rare genetic lung disease, the sniffling, coughing and congestion never end. The tiny hairlike structures called cilia that normally sweep mucus through the airways don’t work properly in people with what’s known as primary ciliary

Microscopic collisions help proteins stay healthy

August 5, 2016 by Will Sansom, UT Health Sciences Center This is a model of the structure of clathrin, the protein that researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio used to study how a heat shock protein disassembles protein complexes. Heat shock proteins ram into other proteins, generating force that is

NIH study visualizes proteins involved in cancer cell metabolism

Cryo-EM methods can determine structures of small proteins bound to potential drug candidates. Thursday, May 26, 2016 NIH Scientists using a technology called cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy) have broken through a technological barrier in visualizing proteins with an approach that may have an impact on drug discovery and development. They were able to capture images of

May 26th, 2016|Categories: Cancer|Tags: , , |

New optogenetic tool moves proteins within cells to study biological changes

Posted: Apr 18, 2016 (Nanowerk News) Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a way to embed light-responsive switches into proteins so that researchers can use lasers to manipulate protein movement and activity within living cells and animals. Using this technique, the UNC team of scientists forced proteins out of