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St. Louis is among the world’s leading cities in cancer research

Some 1.75 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. this year, the National Cancer Institute estimates, and more than 600,000 people will die. But St. Louisans facing cancer often have a fighting chance nowadays, thanks to cutting-edge research and treatment pioneered at local institutions and hospitals. New insights into cancer’s genetic

August 13th, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer|Tags: , , |

Brain tumors occur often in kids with common genetic syndrome

The frequency of brain tumors has been underestimated in children with the common genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), according to a new study. This disorder is characterized by birthmarks on the skin and benign nerve tumors that develop in or on the skin. Brain tumors also are known to occur in children and adults

Increase in Blood-Brain Barrier Protein May Protect Against MS, Study Finds

One way the body may protect itself from nerve cell inflammation is to have cells in the blood-brain barrier increase their production of a protein that keeps immune cells from entering the brain, researchers in Germany and Canada report. The finding suggests that scientists could develop a multiple sclerosis therapy around the protein, known as

Chemo-loaded nanoparticles target breast cancer that has spread to bone

Breast cancer that spreads often infiltrates bone, causing fractures and intense pain. In such cases, chemotherapy is ineffective because the environment of the bone protects the tumor, even as the drug has toxic side effects elsewhere in the body. Now, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a nanoparticle that

Researchers hit the brakes on lethal brain cancers in mice

New research conducted in mice provides evidence that highly lethal brain tumors, called high-grade gliomas, stop growing when deprived of a specific molecule naturally produced when brain cells fire. The experiments, led by a group of scientists from Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, suggest that targeting a protein called neuroligin-3 may prove beneficial in patients

September 28th, 2017|Categories: Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , , |

How cancer tricks the lymphatic system into spreading tumours

MON, MAY 11, 2015 12:35 CET [PRESS RELEASE, 11 MAY 2015]  Swollen lymph nodes are often the earliest sign of metastatic spread of cancer cells. Now cancer researchers and immunologists at Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet have discovered how cancer cells can infiltrate the lymphatic system by ‘disguising’ themselves as immune cells (white blood cells). The researchers