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$3.7 million to help research neurological disorders linked to manganese

Manganese – found in smoke from steel production and coal fires – has been linked to a range of neurological problems often seen with Parkinson’s disease: slowness, stiffness, tremors, anxiety, depression, cognitive changes, and difficulty walking and speaking. Decades ago, federal environmental and public health agencies established manganese-concentration levels of concern for human health, but

New Class of Molecules Protect Neural Cell Integrity Upon Injury

Research led by Nicolas Bazan, MD, PhD, Boyd Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health New Orleans, has discovered a new class of molecules in the brain that synchronize cell-to-cell communication and neuroinflammation/immune activity in response to injury or diseases. Elovanoids (ELVs) are bioactive chemical messengers made from omega-3 very

October 15th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , , , |

Virtual Brain Lab Brings Together World-leading Neuroscientists

Twenty-one leading neuroscience groups from around the world, including seven from UCL, have formed a "virtual brain lab" to test how the brain controls learning and decision making. The £10 million International Brain Lab brings together groups from UK, USA, France, Switzerland and Portugal to uncover how complex networks of brain cells support our ability to

October 14th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , |

SLU Scientist: Hibernating Ribosomes Help Bacteria Survive

In the second of two high-profile articles published in recent weeks, Saint Louis University scientist Mee-Ngan F. Yap, Ph.D., in collaboration with the laboratories of 2009 Nobel laureate in chemistry Ada Yonath at the Weizmann Institute of Science and Alexey Amunts at Stockholm University, describe in Nature Communications new information about the structure of Staphylococcus

October 12th, 2017|Categories: Around The State, General News|Tags: , , |

Biologists Identify Possible New Strategy for Halting Brain Tumors

MIT biologists have discovered a fundamental mechanism that helps brain tumors called glioblastomas grow aggressively. After blocking this mechanism in mice, the researchers were able to halt tumor growth. The researchers also identified a genetic marker that could be used to predict which patients would most likely benefit from this type of treatment. Glioblastoma is

October 9th, 2017|Categories: Cancer, Disease Specific|Tags: , , |

Memory For Details Matures Gradually

In contrast to previous assumptions, the hippocampus, a brain structure that is central to learning and memory, does not complete its maturation until adolescence. Scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, and the University of Stirling were able to show this for

October 8th, 2017|Categories: General News|Tags: , |

Gene Immunotherapy Protects Against MS in Mice

A potent and long-lasting gene immunotherapy approach prevents and reverses symptoms of multiple sclerosis in mice, according to a study published September 21st in the journal Molecular Therapy. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which T cells destroy the myelin sheath--the material that surrounds and protects nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The

Tension Makes the Heart Grow Stronger

By taking videos of a tiny beating zebrafish heart as it reconstructs its covering in a petri dish, scientists have captured unexpected dynamics of cells involved in tissue regeneration. They found that the depleted heart tissue regenerates itself in a wave, led by a front of fast-moving, supersized cells and trailed by smaller cells that