SLU Researchers Discover Structure of Protein Associated with Inflammation, Parkinson’s

In a recent paper published in Nature Communications, Saint Louis University scientists report that they have determined the structure of a key protein that is involved in the body’s inflammatory response. This finding opens the door to developing new treatments for a wide range of illnesses, from heart disease, diabetes and cancer to neurodegenerative disorders, including

New way to fight sepsis: Rev up patients’ immune systems

While many people have never heard of sepsis, it causes about 250,000 deaths annually in the United States. The condition develops when an infection triggers an overwhelming immune response, ultimately wreaking havoc on the immune system. Standard treatment involves high doses of antibiotics that fight the infection, but they often don’t work well and fail

New Study Examines Investigational Drug Given Early to Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s

In a new multi-center Phase II/III clinical trial, Saint Louis University researchers will test the safety and efficacy of an investigational drug’s ability to slow the decline of brain function and possibly delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease in those at risk for Alzheimer’s disease who do not yet have symptoms of the illness. George Grossberg,

Increase in Blood-Brain Barrier Protein May Protect Against MS, Study Finds

One way the body may protect itself from nerve cell inflammation is to have cells in the blood-brain barrier increase their production of a protein that keeps immune cells from entering the brain, researchers in Germany and Canada report. The finding suggests that scientists could develop a multiple sclerosis therapy around the protein, known as

CRISPR enhances cancer immunotherapy

Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first cellular immunotherapies to treat cancer. These therapies involve collecting a patient’s own immune cells — called T cells — and supercharging them to home in on and attack specific blood cancers, such as hard-to-treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. But so far, these T

A CRISPR cure for Huntington’s?

The gene editing system CRISPR-Cas9 has generated excitement in scientific circles for its potential to cure diseases caused by a single defective gene, including the progressive neurological disorder Huntington’s. But editing genes with this technology is risky because cutting strands of DNA can lead to unintentional gene edits, causing dangerous off-target effects. Scientists at the Institute

New CRISPR tools can detect infections like HPV, dengue, and Zika

Scientists are harnessing the same technology behind the powerful gene-editing tool CRISPR to develop cheap devices that can quickly diagnose infections. These systems, described in new research, have the potential to revolutionize how we detect and respond to viruses like HPV and Zika, especially in developing countries. The new tools, developed by the labs of

March 2nd, 2018|Categories: General News|Tags: , , , , |

Similarities found in cancer initiation in kidney, liver, stomach, pancreas

Recent research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrated that mature cells in the stomach sometimes revert back to behaving like rapidly dividing stem cells. Now, the researchers have found that this process may be universal; no matter the organ, when tissue responds to certain types of injury, mature cells seem to

February 22nd, 2018|Categories: Around The State, Cancer|Tags: , , , |